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Post Info TOPIC: The Great Ranger III leaking keel


Voyager Contributor

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Posts: 2599
Date: May 29, 2011
The Great Ranger III leaking keel
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Following the techniques shown on another post on the same problem, a friend and I drilled out the rivets that fasten the floor plate over the keel in the front seat area.  Man, what a mess!  Obviously repaired once before, I discovered a ton of dirt and some other debris that covered a 6-inch longitudinal split in the keel.  This explains the welded repair visible from the exterior.

After digging out and sucking up all the debris, I cleaned up both sides of the floor plate with an aggressive wire brush on my drill press, then scuffed up the bottom around the plate's perimeter.  Unfortuntely, the holes were oversized, so I re-drilled them to a 3/16 dia and made a strip to lay over the edge of the panel.  After wiping it all out with alcohol, I used an entire tube of sealant to completely close that particular area, then we installed the old floor plate (that also got a liberal coating of sealant on its underside), followed by the two edge strips I cut from .105" aluminum plate.  With a rivet placed head-side against the bottom, we shot a couple of rivets from the inside, until the heads sucked up tight against the bottom.

Now more than 24 hours after, it ought to hold water and not leak any back through the keel toward the stern.  I've got my fingers crossed because I'm no riveteer by anyone's stretch.  I'll keep you posted.  Thanks for mail-order OJT on this fix.  Sure came in handy.

The last photo shows the roof of our neighbor's house 200 yds away that damn-near burned down last night, all started because the couple living there prepared their evening dinner on a hibachi that they left sitting on their wood deck, then retired for the night without dousing the embers still in the hibachi.  At 2230, I heard frantic screams through our front sliding door and walked out to hear another of my neighbors try to wake up the home owner who was asleep.  When he finally was awakened, the eas end of his house was engulfed in flames shooing upwards of 40 feet.  After calling 911 myself, I rushed down just in time when the wife was struggling to get out after snagging her foot on a nail in the balcony that tore it open.  When I got there I asked where her husband was and she said she didn't know.  So I took off toward the fire where I found him spraying the roof from below while my other neighbor escorted his wife out of harm's way.  Moments late a dozen fire-fighting vehicles and sheriff deputies plus EMT vehicles rolled up, all with emergency lights flashing like crazy.  One truck near the back of the parade stopped at a fire hydrant and made a dry connection to it, then slowly drove up towards the driveway which the lead pumper pulled into.  The pumper connected to the hydrant then spiced from his vehicle onto the truck in the driveway and opened the water value to energize the lead truck's pump.  When that occurred, the lead truck crew then dragged smaller hoses to the house where, after energizing their hoses, the hit the flames with a blast of water powerful enough to knock down a good-sized tree and put out the blaze in mere seconds.  In short, it was a crazy night that kept me up and outside in a pair of shorts and a T-shirt until nearly 0200 when the family were allowed inside to get a few belongings before leaving for the daugther's place in ABQ.  While all this was going on, other neighbors took to their cars to rubber neck, all of whom were turned away by the deputy deployed at the upper end of the scene except one kook on his dirt bike who whipped through as if nothing was going on!  FYI, we are in an "Extreme" high fire danger condition here right now where no charcoal fires are permitted, even on residential property.  My property and the homeowner's, are bounded by the Cibola National Forest, and its no secret that one tiny spark can set the whole shebang on fire in an instant.  Moisture content in the forst is at or below 5% which, if a fire were to spark, would envelope thousands of acres, especially right now when sustained seasonal winds are at their peak at speeds of up to 60 MPH in many areas.  One of several reasons I'm not leaving home until conditions settle down. 

    



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Bob

"Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being governed by those who aren't."          Plato



Voyager Contributor

Status: Offline
Posts: 2599
Date: May 29, 2011
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After dipping the trailer tongue support to cause water to stay in the helm area, I poured in about 5 gallons of water then went to visit a nearby neighbor.  Upon my return, I checked for water under the keel from one end of the boat to the other and, Voila!  Dry as a bone.  This brings up the question:  Can I expect water not to seep in from the outside?  I filled with boat once with about 50 or so gallons of water and it didn't leak then.  So does it need to squat in the water to make sure it won't leak, or is water sitting on the keel plate a test of my goop applications skills and rivet bucking?



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Bob

"Those who are too smart to engage in politics are punished by being governed by those who aren't."          Plato



Deluxe Runabout Contributor

Status: Offline
Posts: 479
Date: May 30, 2011
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After a similar repair to my Ranger,I filled the hull half full of water.No leaks.Running wot was a different story.Good luck

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